Beyond the variety of music at the annual Monterey Jazz Festival is a wide range of soulful emotions.

On Saturday afternoon, under the warm afternoon sun covering the Garden Stage, Christone "Kingfish" Ingram changed facial expressions with every note of his searing guitar solos—sometimes seemingly grimacing in pain. The following night on the same stage, trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire had a similar look. He stood nearly statue still, eyes closed, as he belted out notes over a string quartet, pianist and drummer.

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Across the festival grounds, drummer Antonio Sanchez mimicked facial expressions similar to Ingram as Sanchez played in Dizzy's Den with his quintet Migration—every drumbeat or cymbal crash was an extension of his mood.

The emotions mixed with the stark, colorful stage lighting to create an atmosphere where the audience could get lost in the music.

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