Hot Picks 08.04.22

Trombone Shorty and Orleans Avenue bring big brass band sounds, mixed with more, to the Golden State Theatre on Thursday, Aug. 4.

NOLA Sound

The musician Troy Andrews, aka Trombone Shorty, is just 36 but already has an extensive music career, thanks in part to the fact that he started playing trombone on the streets of New Orleans at the age of 4. Growing up in a musical family in the city of jazz also helped. No longer dwarfed by his chosen instrument, Andrews has released five studio albums including 2022’s Lifted, the title track of which displays Andrews’ aptitude for blending traditional brass band sounds with other musical styles – in this case hard rock. Hear it, and more, when Trombone Shorty and Orleans Avenue hit the Golden State Theatre. [TCL]

8pm Thursday, Aug. 4. Golden State Theatre, 417 Alvarado St., Monterey. $29-$69. 649-1070, goldenstatetheatre.com.

Yee Haw

Active Seniors in Salinas continuously lives up to the “active” part of its name. The membership-based nonprofit community center holds ukulele classes, yoga classes and ballroom dance nights. It also, this week, holds a Western dance night. Instructors review some classic Western dances first (think: two-step or waltz) and then attendees will dance the night away to tunes by DJ Dwight. You needn’t be a senior to participate, though members do get a discount on tickets. As we said, yee haw. [TCL]

7-9:30pm Friday, Aug. 5. Active Seniors Inc., 100 Harvest St., Salinas. $4/members; $8/non-members. 424-5066, activeseniorsinc.org.

Fiesta Time

Do you ever really need an excuse to party? Not really, in most cases. However, when in 1989 some Carmel Valley residents learned the post office was turning 100, it seemed like a reason to celebrate. And they’ve been living it up ever since. Carmel Valley Fiesta is a weekend packed with fun stuff. There are pancake breakfasts, free concerts, food vendors, dog shows, car shows, a mountain run… hang on a moment. That doesn’t sound like a lot of fun, unless maybe the race is downhill. But horseshoe tournaments and park activities for the family, yeah. Unambiguously fun. It all kicks off with a Friday night hoopla, at 5pm at the Carmel Valley Trail & Saddle Club ($20-$45), with barbecue and music. It wraps up Sunday with the big raffle drawing (the winner gets to spend a week in Costa Rica; more fun). Maybe you do need an excuse to party. [DF]

8am-6pm Saturday, Aug. 6; 8am-4pm Sunday, Aug. 7. Carmel Valley Community Park, 25 Ford Road, Carmel Valley (Mountain Run is at Garland Ranch Regional Park). Free. 298-0018.

All in on the Arts

Visit East Garrison this weekend for an art fair organized by the East Garrison Social Committee. East Garrison is a new community adjacent to Fort Ord National Monument, with future plans for a vibrant arts district – but that doesn’t mean you have to wait to experience the art scene. Organizers promise art activities for all ages and demos by local artists. In addition to a strong representation of painters (Al Shamble, Cynthia Christine, Sally Welch, Sue Spence), one will have a chance to encounter authors Chris Swainson and David Spiselman, photographers Samantha Nunes and Barbara Barbour and other types of artists, such as Sherry McGlothlin (mosaics), Bonnie Adcox (sewing), Teresa Cheung (knitting and crocheting) or Rebecca Henriksen (flower arrangements and pottery). “As East Garrison eagerly awaits the promised artists studios and living spaces to be developed here, we decided to showcase the artistic talents of our community,” Shamble wrote on behalf of the committee. [AP]

10am-4pm Saturday, Aug. 6. 13900 Sherman Blvd., East Garrison; event is outdoors. Free. ashamble@prodigy.net.

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Big Wheels

The math on this is going to get complicated, so hang on. Every picture tells a story worth 1,000 words. Every car tells a story, too – although no one has capped a word count, so it could be 10,000 or more. The Center for Photographic Art multiplies all of this in an exhibit of John G. Zimmerman’s photographs of automobiles, the people and culture surrounding them from the 1950s-1970s. The exhibit is called “Auto America” and around 45 images will be on display. Someone else can do the math, but it adds up to a lot of conversation in the gallery. Zimmerman originally took these for national magazines like Life and Sports Illustrated. They capture a time when American car culture was at its peak, stylish and optimistic and gleaming with chrome. Well, maybe not so stylish and optimistic in the ’70s, but you get the gist. Cars are art. The exhibit runs through Sept. 4 with extended hours during Car Week, Aug. 15-19. [DF]

Opening reception 4-6pm, Saturday, Aug. 6. Center for Photographic Art, San Carlos between 8th and 9th, Carmel (in the Sunset Center). Free. 625-5181, photography.org.

Never Forget

Since the U.S. bombings in 1945 of Hiroshima on Aug. 6 and Nagasaki on Aug. 9, there has been a strong and persistent desire to annually mark those days as a way to both honor the approximately 250,000 lives lost and the generations of Japanese who still live with the pain, as well as to remind the world that such destructive power should never be unleashed again. These days are not just commemorated in Japan but the world over, including, since 2004, in Pacific Grove. The Monterey County branch of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom faithfully sponsors an annual Hiroshima-Nagasaki Remembrance Day that includes speakers and a lovely peace lantern ceremony at Lovers Point Cove. The event begins with lantern making and remarks with the hope of peace and a nuclear-free world, and ends after the lanterns are lit and pulled out over the water by kayaks. [PM]

7pm Saturday, Aug. 6. Lovers Point, Pacific Grove. Free. tinyurl.com/WILPF-Monterey-County-Branch.

Peaceful Sounds

It’s not just composers from centuries ago who wrote great works. The Monterey County Composers’ Forum presents new music by local composers and songwriters. The concert, titled “Peace Pieces,” features a special guest, soprano Leberta Loral – and includes works for flute, clarinet, guitar, marimba, piano, oboe, recorder and percussion by no fewer than nine composers. “The MCCF is an unusual organization of composers of greatly different styles from songwriting to popular idioms to modern ‘classical,’” wrote Carleton Macy on behalf of the forum. “The variety of music presented will amaze and fascinate.” [AP]

3pm Sunday, August 7. Hidden Valley Music Seminars, 104 W. Carmel Valley Road, Carmel Valley. $15. 385-0973, mccomposers.org.

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