Sweet Repose in Carmel

HomePage: Apple Pie: T.N.T. Painting and Decorating have remodeled this Carmel house using a palette of warm colors that look good enough to eat. Hali Jones

Noah and Ian Trosky are brothers, Candace and Amy their wives, and together they make a team of home remodelers called T.N.T. Painting and Decorating. They call the house they’ve just completed ‘Apple Pie.’ It’s a food-lover’s guess that the name comes in part from the warm, fresh-baked-crust colors inside and out, and because there are apple trees on the property.

One feels infused with warmth upon entering the front door to discover a subtle saturation in the tasty shades of pastry everywhere from floors to ceilings and the surfaces in between. Big windows invite the full day’s light in to illuminate or gently deepen the colors as the sun moves. The interior feels  sometimes buttery, sometimes honey, other times just generally edible.

In the great room, the ceilings are vaulted to a peak with exposed beams in scale with the size of the house. The beams have been surface distressed and painted to attract no specific attention to themselves, and simply hold the roof. Below, the floors throughout are wide-plank cherry and stained in a luscious deep honey color.

Under a broad arch that separates the kitchen from the great room, the cherry wood is repeated in all the cabinets and fronts all the appliances, except the stove, a stainless Viking Professional. The Fisher & Paykel double dishwasher is disguised as cabinetry as well and, until open, no hint of the newest concept in cleaning up is suspected.

Bisecting the great room from the kitchen, a long polished slab of limestone represents all the counters in the kitchen. Over the black porcelain sink are two large windows looking directly onto a community of morning glories successfully storming the side fence, while above, a huge brilliant skylight seems to carve a shaft up toward deep blue infinity. At night, the stars are perfectly framed and seem somehow very near.

Little within the house design is predictable, yet nothing is highlighted as unique. The scales of various rooms are hugely different yet the balance in the house is spot-on. In the rear on the first floor, two small bedrooms and a bath are tucked away to look out over the backyard through big corner windows set at 90 degrees. Then, up a refreshingly broad staircase, the master bedroom and bath use the second floor in aggregate. In fact, the master is a foot larger than the great room below, with the same vaulted, supported ceiling and enormous windows with views over trees and around roofs toward the sea.

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In the rear, as seen through the back door and from all bedrooms, is a large and shapely river-stone fireplace regally articulating one full corner. Beginning under its hearth is the round top of one half a yin yang design laid in oatmeal slate, while the second half spoons in deep green grass. They complete the back yard that looks onto the south side of a house the color of ginger bread in the afternoon sun. Noah Trosky says, “What we like so much about this house is the feelings of openness and calm and how the property just seems to draw you in.” Only the whiff of good baking could enhance the effect.

Price $1,495,000 Guadalupe 2nd NW of 2nd, Carmel. Contact Pat and Wendy, Coldwell Banker Del Monte Realty, 626-2221.

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