Flag Waving

Free speech would have been the right of the battlefield soldier who fought and won/lost. Today there isn’t anyone alive that bears that right (“A Confederate flag flying in Carmel prompts an anti-hate resolution,” June 17-23). I would proudly say, if you feel entitled enough to fly that flag for what it has come to represent – hate, racism, bigotry, negative behavior just to name a few – well, bubba, don’t feel judged. Patricia Flores | Seaside

If I understand this correctly an anti-hate resolution by Carmel would take precedence over U.S. First Amendment rights. Many places in the world view the U.S. flag as hateful. If anti-hate applies to one does it not apply to all? Scott Cunningham | Carmel Valley

The Confederate flag is as much a racist symbol of genocide as the swastika was in Germany. The Jan. 6 insurrectionists carried it into the U.S. Capitol. That tells you everything you need to know about what it means in the 21st century. Roger Kern | via social media

The “author” and “historian” who is pushing this controversy needs to go back to school and study the Constitution. There is no such thing as “hate speech.” Hate is not illegal. We all have the right to hate what we want to hate. We all have the right to express our hate in words and symbols. The First Amendment was designed to protect the right to partake in unpopular and even offensive speech. Jim Catalano | Salinas

I honestly do not get why people fly the flag of a losing side in a war ultimately about slavery and do not know it 100-percent tells the world they would be thrilled if the South had won. I see this flag, I immediately know you’re racist. Koly McBride | Gonzales

No one wants to “erase” history. Far from it. We should never forget the atrocities of the Confederacy. When I see that flag, it is a clear indication that the person flying it is choosing to honor Confederate traitors over the United States. There is no gray area. Nate Gomez | Seaside

Out for a walk in my Marina neighborhood, I was shocked to see a neighbor at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac flying the Confederate battle flag. The house itself is a bit dilapidated, the yard overrun with weeds, and the whole sight just made me sad and angry. I intend to reach out to the mayor to advance a similar statement by the city against such displays. Jeffrey Weekley | Marina

Honor History

Goes to show ya, you can’t please all the people all the time (“Conversations break down surrounding a controversial Juneteenth event,” posted June 16). Virginia Ray | via social media

Reputation Control

I was saddened to read the article regarding Augustine Nevarez, director of student affairs at Hartnell College (“A Hartnell administrator intervenes in a lawsuit, aiming to block his information from release,” June 17-23). Having known Mr. Nevarez professionally and personally for many years, it is heartbreaking that his dedication to students is not the topic of discussion. For years, Nevarez has provided critical resources and support to Hartnell’s community. I have witnessed first-hand his ability to help students navigate the trauma of homelessness, mental illness, assault, hunger, and the pain of being marginalized or shamed due to sexual orientation or immigration status.

The fact that one individual has been hell-bent for several years on defaming him over an adult, consensual relationship is homophobic and hateful – and the decision of the Weekly to publish this article is disappointing. I wonder whether the Weekly would have made an equal effort to publish an article about a relationship with a “student” rather than a “male student.” Would you similarly specify a relationship with a “female student”? Are you contributing to the sensationalism and homophobia that Andrew Sandoval is trying to create? Amy Lehman | Salinas

Magic Trick

Interesting leadership quote from board president Carey Pearce [“He declined to comment and only said, ‘Ask Steve Vagnini about it’”]. I’m sure there will be more crazy information about this down the road – so much drama from such a small building (“Monterey History and Art Association catches a tax break thanks to county appeals board,” posted June 18). Chris Carpenter | via social media

Dmitry Piterman is starting to donate some of his Dali art to MHAA? In the meantime [the Monterey History and Art Association] pays the city of Monterey $1 per year to lease the building. Must be nice! CJ Howard | via social media

BUG BITES

I appreciate your article about the increase of Ixodes pacificus ticks here in Monterey County (“New research shows Lyme disease is more widespread than presumed on the Central Coast,” June 17-23). My husband and I have been bitten last winter and spring by Western blacklegged deer ticks. Both of us have been on doxycycline treatments. After two years of telling several doctors all my problems, they made me believe I was crazy. Doctors are generally uneducated about this type of tick. My story is too long to tell, but this tick outbreak is very real and very dangerous. Marion Weaver | via email

Art Works

Many thanks to Monterey County Weekly for choosing my mural story for a Local Inspiration piece! (“Garden mural,” posted June 16.) Amanda Menefee | Carmel Valley

Correction

A caption (“Etc. Photo,” June 17-23) incorrectly described what looked like dew on a strawberry leaf. It was not dew, but sap. Under the right conditions, sap is released through an opening at the leaf margin called a hydathode. Not all plants have hydathodes, but strawberries do. When the sap dries, it can leave behind a white residue from salts and minerals.

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